What Is An Administrative Medical Assistant?

An administrative medical assistant is one of two types of medical assistant, the other being the clinical medical assistant. There has been a lot of interest in recent years in medical assisting as a career path. According to the US Department of Labor, job growth in the medical assisting field looks very good up to 2018, which gives interested people all the time they need to get fully qualified and still take advantage of that booming job sector. If you’ve heard of administrative medical assisting, but don’t really know what it is, this article will give you a quick overview.

SIMILAR TERMS

There are a lot of similar terms out there for pretty much the same thing. An administrative medical assistant is the same thing as a medical administrator and a medical secretary. Medical assistants come in two main categories: the administrative assistants and the clinical assistants. The difference is that the administrative assistants do mostly clerical work, while the clinical assistants will also work directly with patients in a limited capacity.

WORK ENVIRONMENT

Medical administrative assistants work in hospital reception rooms, nursing homes, and doctor’s offices. They also work in dentists offices, and ophthalmologists’ offices. These work environments are well-lit, well-organized, and clean. They are generally quiet, with the exception of the emergency reception of a hospital, and tend to be low-stress, with the exception of emergency rooms, and situations involving giving shots to or taking blood from young children.

SKILLS AND TRAINING

Whether or not a medical assistant is required to be certified, and what tasks may be delegated to him or her varies from country to country and from state to state.

Medical administrative assistants answer the phone, organize patient files, book appointments, and lead people from the waiting room to the examination rooms in a doctor’s office. Their skills include medical terminology, medical billing, medical coding, and those office administration skills that any other secretary would have.

A medical administrative assistant may or may not have post-secondary education, although many do. Those that don’t get trained on the job. In the United States, certification is not required by law, but is strongly preferred by most employers. There are many certifying organizations out there for medical administrative assistants to join. For example, the American Association of Medical Assistants (AAMA), which administers certification for the title of CMA (Certified Medical Assistant).

PAY AND ADVANCEMENT

It is possible to make a good wage working as an administrative medical assistant, and there are plenty of opportunities for advancement as well. Not only that, but much of the training to become an administrative medical assistant can be applied to different fields. For example, a knowledge of medical billing and coding, while useful to an administrative medical assistant, can also be applied to a career in medical billing and coding.

I hope this article has helped you come to a better understanding of what an administrative medical assistant is, and whether or not you might be interested in training in that field. No matter what you decide, being informed will help you to make a decision you won’t regret.

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